YOU books: It’s never too late to write your next chapter

Must read

Goodbye trolls! Instagram’s new feature will stop people from posting offensive comments on your photos

Keyword moderation tool enables the user to block offensive words  Previously only available to business users but now open to all  The tool...

The Right Gifts That You Need to Have Now

Ok, the dress does not make the monk. But against a recruiter, the saying flies. A good first impression also goes through your clothes....

Top 8 Essential Mobile App Designing Tools

Introduction Every designer needs the appropriate app design platform to create an attractive and enticing user experience for smartphone apps. And to make that happen, they're...

Naya Rivera: The story behind my abortion

Editor's note: Naya Rivera is an actress, singer, and author of the new memoir, Sorry Not Sorry: Dreams, Mistakes, and Growing Up (TarcherPerigee). For six seasons,...
Lucille Barretthttps://bloggingkits.org
Future teen idol. Hardcore tv lover. Social media guru. Zombie aficionado. Travel scholar. Biker, shiba-inu lover, audiophile, Mad Men fan and proud pixelpusher. Working at the junction of minimalism and elegance to answer design problems with honest solutions. I'm fueled by craft beer, hip-hop and tortilla chips.




Many of us feel that we have a book in us, but few get round to putting pen to paper. Victoria Woodhall meets some inspirational late-blooming novelists.

Dinah Jefferies The Silk Merchant’s Daughter

Dinah, 67, began writing seven years ago. She has since had three novels published, including a number one bestseller. She has worked as a teacher and an artist and lives in Gloucestershire with her husband. She has a daughter and two grandchildren.

The motivation My husband Richard and I lost almost all our savings in the financial crash of 2008. We had retired to Andalusia but had to move back to the UK. I had been thinking about writing a novel for some time and thought now would be the time to give it a go. My first didn’t get published, but it did attract an agent. My next book, The Separation, was sold to Penguin.

Read More Articles :

The inspiration My 14-year-old son Jamie died in a motorbike accident in 1985. It felt like the end of the world, and I draw on the experience of loss in my writing. For The Separation, I relied heavily on my childhood in Malaysia and the shock of how it felt to move to England when I was nine. The themes for all my books reflect my life and include deception, secrets, and uncertainty – as well as passion.




The method Once I’d decided to set my next novel, The Tea Planter’s Wife, in Sri Lanka, I read as much as I could about the country. My late mother-in-law was born in India, and a conversation sparked the idea for the central story about a heartbreaking decision reflecting the racism of the 1920s.

The life changes My life as a writer has been peppered with moments of euphoria (when The Tea Planter’s Wife stayed in the top ten for 15 weeks) and doubts (when I agonize over whether a story will work). Writing has allowed me to travel to Vietnam – where my latest book, The Silk Merchant’s Daughter, is set – Sri Lanka and India for research. Returning to the East felt like going home.

Tip It took me seven years to write a bestseller. I stuck Post-it notes all over my wall saying things I wanted to achieve but phrased as though they had already happened. I had notes that read: ‘I have received a fantastic advance’ and ‘My books are published worldwide.’ In my subconscious, I was already there.

Travel n Tour

Former Blue Peter presenter Janet, 60, is a three-year-old mother (including singer Sophie Ellis-Bextor) and grandmother of four. She landed her debut publishing deal last year.

The motivation I’d always wanted to write a book, but I thought I would have to get up early, write a set number of words a day, and lock myself away. Once I got going, though, I fitted it into my life. I felt brave enough to write a story that people might not expect from a former Blue Peter presenter. My heroine is not entirely likable, and her actions might shock me, but I didn’t feel inhibited as I wrote.

The inspiration The Butcher’s Hook is about Anne in Georgian London who develops an obsession with a butcher’s apprentice. I kept a teenage diary, so Anne’s introspection and selfishness feel very familiar. I remember the way you fall in love when you’re young: fancying someone rotten, regardless of whether they’re the right person in any way.




More articles

Latest article

Goodbye trolls! Instagram’s new feature will stop people from posting offensive comments on your photos

Keyword moderation tool enables the user to block offensive words  Previously only available to business users but now open to all  The tool...

The Right Gifts That You Need to Have Now

Ok, the dress does not make the monk. But against a recruiter, the saying flies. A good first impression also goes through your clothes....

Top 8 Essential Mobile App Designing Tools

Introduction Every designer needs the appropriate app design platform to create an attractive and enticing user experience for smartphone apps. And to make that happen, they're...

Naya Rivera: The story behind my abortion

Editor's note: Naya Rivera is an actress, singer, and author of the new memoir, Sorry Not Sorry: Dreams, Mistakes, and Growing Up (TarcherPerigee). For six seasons,...

Gold ETFs Are Still A Smart Volatility Hedge

Gold is not bereft of volatility, but the yellow metal is often thought of as a hedge against equity market turbulence. Treasury yields rest...